Martial Arts

Let me aware about martial arts if anyone know. After speaking to others on the web, I found the answer. Martial arts are systems of codified practices and traditions of training for combat. Though studied for various reasons, broadly speaking, martial arts share a single objective: to defeat a person physically or to defend oneself from physical threat. Some martial arts are linked to spiritual or religious beliefs/philosophies such as Buddhism, Daoism or Shinto while others have their own spiritual/non-spiritual code of honour. Martial arts are commonly associated with East Asian cultures, but are by no means unique to Asia. Throughout Europe there was an extensive system of combat martial arts, collectively referred to as Historical European martial arts, that existed until modern times and is now being reconstructed by several organizations while Savate is a French kicking style developed by sailors and street fighters. In the Americas Native Americans have a tradition of open-handed martial arts, that includes wrestling and Hawaiians have historically practiced arts featuring small and large joint manipulation, a mix of origins occur in the athletic movements of Capoeira that was created in Brazil by slaves, based on skills brought with them from Africa. While each style has unique facets that makes it different from other martial arts, a common characteristic is the systemization of fighting techniques. Methods of training vary and may include sparring or forms (kata), which are sets or routines of techniques that are performed alone, or sometimes with a partner, and which are especially common in the Asian and Asian-derived martial arts,[1]. The word ‘martial’ derives from the name of Mars, the Roman god of war. The term ‘Martial Arts’ literally means arts of Mars. This term comes from 15th century Europeans who were referring to their own fighting arts that are today known as Historical European martial arts. A practitioner of martial arts is referred to as a martial artist.

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14 Replies to “Martial Arts”

  1. Its meaning of Judo is “gentle way”, is a modern Japanese martial art (gendai budō) and combat sport, that originated in Japan in the late nineteenth century. Its most prominent feature is its competitive element, where the object is to either throw one’s opponent to the ground, immobilize or otherwise subdue one’s opponent with a grappling maneuver, or force an opponent to submit by joint locking the elbow or by applying a choke. Strikes and thrusts (by hands and feet) – as well as weapons defenses – are a part of judo, but only in pre-arranged forms (kata) and are not allowed in judo competition or free practice (randori).

  2. Martial arts are systems of codified practices and traditions of training for combat. Though studied for various reasons, broadly speaking, martial arts share a single objective: to defeat a person physically or to defend oneself from physical threat. Some martial arts are linked to spiritual or religious beliefs/philosophies such as Buddhism, Daoism or Shinto while others have their own spiritual/non-spiritual code of honour.

    Martial arts are commonly associated with East Asian cultures, but are by no means unique to Asia. Throughout Europe there was an extensive system of combat martial arts, collectively referred to as Historical European martial arts, that existed until modern times and is now being reconstructed by several organizations while Savate is a French kicking style developed by sailors and street fighters. In the Americas Native Americans have a tradition of open-handed martial arts, that includes wrestling and Hawaiians have historically practiced arts featuring small and large joint manipulation, a mix of origins occur in the athletic movements of Capoeira that was created in Brazil by slaves, based on skills brought with them from Africa.

    During times when each style has unique facets that makes it different from other martial arts, a common characteristic is the systemization of fighting techniques. Methods of training vary and may include sparring or forms (kata), which are sets or routines of techniques that are performed alone, or sometimes with a partner, and which are especially common in the Asian and Asian-derived martial arts

    The word ‘martial’ derives from the name of Mars, the Roman god of war. The term ‘Martial Arts’ literally means arts of Mars. This term comes from 15th century Europeans whoever were referring to their own fighting arts that are today known as Historical European martial arts. A practitioner of martial arts is referred to as a martial artist. Martial arts vary widely, and may focus on a specific area or combination of areas, but they can be broadly grouped into focusing on strikes, grappling, or weapons training. Below is a list of examples that make extensive use of one these areas; it is not an exhaustive list of all arts covering the area, nor are these necessarily the only areas covered by the art but are the focus or best known part as examples of the area:Striking

    * Punching – Boxing (Western), Wing Chun

    * Kicking – Capoeira, Savate, Taekwondo
    * Other strikes (e. g. Elbows, knees, open-hand) – Muay Thai, Karate, Shaolin Kung Fu

    Grappling

    * Throwing – Glima, Judo, Jujutsu, Sambo, Shuai jiao
    * Joint lock – Aikido, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Hapkido
    * Pinning Techniques – Judo, Wrestling

    Weaponry

    * Traditional Weaponry – Fencing, Gatka, Kendo, Silambam, Kali
    * Modern Weaponry – Eskrima, Jogo do Pau, Jukendo

    Many martial arts, especially those from Asia, also teach side disciplines which pertain to medicinal practices. This is particularly prevalent in traditional Chinese martial arts which may teach bone-setting, qigong, acupuncture, acupressure (tui na), and other aspects of traditional Chinese medicine

    History
    History of martial arts
    Further information: Martial arts timeline

    Pictorial records of both wrestling and armed combat date to the Bronze Age Ancient Near East, such as the 20th century BC mural in the tomb of Amenemhet at Beni Hassan, or the 26th century BC “Standard of Ur”.
    Ancient depiction of Shaolin monks practicing the art of self defense.
    Ancient depiction of Shaolin monks practicing the art of self defense.
    Early history

    Main article: Asian martial arts (origins)

    The foundation of the Asian martial arts is likely a blend of early Chinese and Indian arts. Extensive trade occurred between these nations beginning around 600 B. C. , with diplomats, merchants, and monks traveling the Silk Roads. During the Warring States period of Chinese history (480-221 B. C. ) extensive development in martial philosophy and strategy emerged, as described by Sun Tzu in The Art of War (c. 350 B. C. )

    An early legend in martial arts tells the tale of the Indian monk Bodhidharma (also named Daruma), believed to have lived around 550 A. D. He is credited with founding the meditative philosophy of Zen Buddhism and influencing the unarmed combat arts of the Shaolin temple in China. The martial virtues of discipline, humility, restraint and respect are attributed to this philosophy

    The teaching of martial arts in Asia has historically followed the cultural traditions of teacher-disciple apprenticeship. Students are trained in a strictly hierarchical system by a master instructor: Sifu in Cantonese or Shifu in Mandarin; Sensei in Japanese; Sa Bum Nim in Korean.

    Modern history

    Main article: Modern history of East Asian martial arts

    In many countries local arts like Te in Okinawa Kenjutsu and Ju-Jutsu in Japan,and Taekyon and Soobak in Korea mixed with other martial arts and evolved to produce some of the more well-known martial arts in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries like Karate, Aikido, and Taekwondo.

    The Western interest in East Asian Martial arts dates back to the late 19th century, due to the increase in trade between America with China and Japan. Relatively few Westerners actually practiced the arts, considering it to be mere performance.

    Edward William Barton-Wright, a railway engineer whoever had studied Jujutsu while working in Japan between 1894–97, was the first man known to have taught Asian martial arts in Europe. He also founded an eclectic martial arts style named Bartitsu which combined jujutsu, judo, boxing, savate and stick fighting.

    As Western influence grew in East Asia a greater number of military personnel spent time in China, Japan, and Korea. Exposure to martial arts during the Korean war was also significant.

    The later 1970s and 1980s witnessed an increased media interest in the martial arts, thanks in part to Asian and Hollywood martial arts movies. Jackie Chan and Jet Li are prominent movie figures whoever have been responsible for promoting Chinese martial arts in recent years.
    Europe East AsiaMartial arts existed in classical European civilization, most notably in Greece where sports were integral to the way of life. Boxing (pygme, pyx), Wrestling (pale) and Pankration (from pan, meaning “all”, and kratos, meaning “power” or “strength&quot were represented in the Ancient Olympic Games. The Romans produced Gladiatorial combat as a public spectacle.

    A number of historical fencing forms and manuals have survived, and many groups are working to reconstruct older European martial arts. The process of reconstruction combines intensive study of detailed combat treatises produced from 1400–1900 A. D. and practical training or “pressure testing” of various techniques and tactics. This includes such styles as sword and shield, two-handed swordfighting, halberd fighting, jousting and other types of melee weapons combat. This reconstruction effort and modern outgrowth of the historical methods is generally referred to as Western martial arts. Many Medieval martial arts manuals have survived, the most famous being Johannes Lichtenauer’s Fechtbuch (Sword Tome) of the 14th century. And so today the Lichtenauer’s tome forms the basis of German school of swordsmanship.

    In Europe, the martial arts declined with the rise of the firearms. As a consequence, martial arts with historical roots in Europe do not exist today to the same extent as in Asia, since the traditional martial arts either died out or developed into sports. Swordplay developed into fencing. Boxing as well as forms of wrestling have endured. European martial arts have mostly adapted to changing technology so that while some traditional arts still exist, military personnel are trained in skills like bayonet combat and marksmanship. Some European weapon systems have also survived as folk sports and as self-defense methods. These include stick-fighting systems such as Jogo do Pau of Portugal and the Juego del Palo style(s) of the Canary Islands.

    Other martial arts evolved into sports that no longer recognized as combative. One example is the pommel horse event in men’s gymnastics, an exercise which itself is derived from the sport of Equestrian vaulting. Cavalryriders needed to be able to change positions on their horses quickly, rescue fallen allies, fight effectively on horseback and dismount at a gallop. Training these skills on a stationery barrel evolved into sport of gymnastics’ pommel horse exercise. More ancient origins exist for the shot put (are you sure you don’t mean discus?) and the javelin throw, both weapons utilized extensively by the Romans.

    Americas

    Native peoples of North America and South America had their own martial training which began in childhood. Some First Nations men and more rarely, some women were named warriors only after they had proved themselves in battle. Most groups selected individuals for training in the use bows, knives, blowguns, spears, and war clubs in early adolescence. War clubs were the preferred martial weapon because Native American warriors could raise their social status by killing enemies in single combat face to face. [citation needed] Warriors honed their weapons skills and stalking techniques through lifelong training.

    Okichitaw is a martial art based on Plains Cree of the Canadian Prairies that specialises in the distinctive gunstock war club, but also encorporates the use of bow, knife, long and short lance and tomahawk as well as grappling and striking techniques.

    Capoeira, with roots in Africa, is a martial art originating in Brazil that involves a high degree of flexibility and endurance. It consists of kicks, elbow strikes, head butts, and sweeps. Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is an adaptation of pre-World War II Judo and jujutsu. Created by Carlos Gra

  3. It is the art of fighting, offensive or defensive or even both. Of course, there are different styles. Chinese have kung fu, Japanese have karate and the Koreans have taekwondo. Also, the Thai people readily use muay thai, the Brazilians use capoeira and the French use savate. The list goes on and on.

  4. i know martial arts.
    martial arts is for defending the people you love and wanna protect.

  5. Martial arts is a broad term that encompasses many different types of activities. Often, we think of self-defense techniques developed in and associated with Asian countries. In reality, though, it includes just about any kind of fighting technique, especially those that focus on hand-to-hand (and foot!) combat.

    Some of the most popular martial arts are Karate, Akido, Tae Kwon Do, Jujitsu, Judo, Kenpo, Kung Fu, and Hapkido. In addition to teaching basic fighting techniques, martial arts also mostly focus heavily on mental discipline, as well as the search for enlightenment.

    Martial arts require dedication and practice. Through regular repetition of hand and foot movements, kicks, blocks, and punches, martial arts students increase their physical strength and mental toughness.

  6. Martial arts are systems of codified practices and traditions of training for combat. Though studied for various reasons, broadly speaking, martial arts share a single objective: to defeat a person physically or to defend oneself from physical threat. Some martial arts are linked to spiritual or religious beliefs/philosophies such as Buddhism, Daoism or Shinto while others have their own spiritual/non-spiritual code of honour.

    Martial arts are commonly associated with East Asian cultures, but are by no means unique to Asia. Throughout Europe there was an extensive system of combat martial arts, collectively referred to as Historical European martial arts, that existed until modern times and is now being reconstructed by several organizations while Savate is a French kicking style developed by sailors and street fighters. In the Americas Native Americans have a tradition of open-handed martial arts, that includes wrestling and Hawaiians have historically practiced arts featuring small and huge joint manipulation, a mix of origins occur in the athletic movements of Capoeira that was created in Brazil by slaves, based on skills brought with them from Africa.

    While each style has unique facets that makes it different from other martial arts, a widely seen characteristic is the systemization of fighting techniques. Methods of training vary and may include sparring or forms (kata), which are sets or routines of techniques that are performed alone, or sometimes with a partner, and which are especially widely seen in the Asian and Asian-derived martial arts,[1].

    The word ‘martial’ derives from the name of Mars, the Roman god of war. The term ‘Martial Arts’ really means arts of Mars. This term comes from 15th century Europeans who were referring to their own fighting arts that are today known as Historical European martial arts. A practitioner of martial arts is referred to as a martial artist.

  7. a method of fighting. However, people nowadays associate martial arts with a ton of traditions and rituals and codes of honor and such.

  8. Martial arts are systems of codified practices and traditions of training for combat. Though studied for various reasons, broadly speaking, martial arts share a single objective: to defeat a person physically or to defend oneself from physical threat. Some martial arts are linked to spiritual or religious beliefs/philosophies such as Buddhism, Daoism or Shinto while others have their own spiritual/non-spiritual code of honour.

    Martial arts are commonly associated with East Asian cultures, but are by no means unique to Asia. Throughout Europe there was an extensive system of combat martial arts, collectively referred to as Historical European martial arts, that existed until modern times and is now being reconstructed by several organizations while Savate is a French kicking style developed by sailors and street fighters. In the Americas Native Americans have a tradition of open-handed martial arts, that includes wrestling and Hawaiians have historically practiced arts featuring small and large joint manipulation, a mix of origins occur in the athletic movements of Capoeira that was created in Brazil by slaves, based on skills brought with them from Africa.

    While each style has unique facets that makes it different from other martial arts, a common characteristic is the systemization of fighting techniques. Methods of training vary and may include sparring or forms (kata), which are sets or routines of techniques that are performed alone, or sometimes with a partner, and which are especially common in the Asian and Asian-derived martial arts,[1].

    The word ‘martial’ derives from the name of Mars, the Roman god of war. The term ‘Martial Arts’ really means arts of Mars. This term comes from 15th century Europeans who were referring to their own fighting arts that are today known as Historical European martial arts. A practitioner of martial arts is referred to as a martial artist.

  9. Martial Arts is a lifestyle coupled with a physical disciplen usually centering around self defence techniques and meditation.

  10. system of combat and self-defense, e. g. judo or karate, developed especially in Japan and Korea and now mostly practiced as a sport